So I’ve been meaning to do a post about our ridiculously awesome chick brooder, but we had a bit of weather this week and it kept me from going out and taking pictures.  The brooder was quite a project because we wanted to be able to keep it outside, rather than having those little poop machines stinking up the house.  Being that it’s winter, that meant it needed to be weather-proof and, most importantly, well insulated.  But that clever fella, he figured out how to build it strong and warm and pretty darn efficient, and on a tight budget to boot.

I had planned to get the brooder post up this afternoon, and then be able to post pictures of the chicks all moved in tomorrow after they arrived.  Well, this morning was a whirlwind – I was on my way out the door to go to work when I got a call from the post office: the chicks came a day early! So here are some brooder-building pictures (not as many as there should have been, sorry) and some little puffball pictures to finish it off.

We spent about $8 on 2x2" sticks to make the frame, and $2 on screws. The plywood is recycled from another project.

We spent about $8 on 2×2″ sticks to make the frame, and $6 on screws and hinges and such. The plywood is recycled from another project.

We ended up settling on a 4x4x2 1/2' size, which will be plenty big enough for 25 chicks, but probably not big enough if we ever want to raise more than that.

We ended up settling on a 4x4x2 1/2′ size, because it fit well with the materials we had.  It will be plenty big enough for 25 chicks, but probably not big enough if we ever want to raise many more than that.

Here's the finished box. What I failed to show you was the part where we insulated it with batting from some old, flat pillows and added interior walls, and then caulked all the joints!

Here’s the finished box. What I failed to show you was the part where we insulated it with batting from some old, flat pillows and added interior walls, and then caulked all the joints to keep the drafts out!

The fancy orange bucket in the previous picture is just a rain cover for the heat lamp, which is attached to the roof of the brooder. Also, the fancy duct tape across the top is just to have the metal hinges of the door to keep rain out.

The fancy orange bucket in the previous picture is just a rain cover for the heat lamp, which is attached to the roof and shines through a hole cut into the top. Also, the fancy duct tape across the top is just to cover the metal hinges of the door and to keep rain out.

None of the feed store folks knew what we were talking about, but we finally found this neat thing at Home Depot - it's a thermostatic switch that turns the heat lamp off and on according to the temperature in the brooder. Only $20!

None of the feed store folks knew what we were talking about, but we finally found this neat thing at Home Depot – it’s a thermostatic switch that turns the heat lamp off and on according to the temperature in the brooder. Only $20!

And here they are! 26 day old Freedom Ranger chicks. So far they are all alive although there's one I'm a little worried about. Good thing the hatchery sent us an extra.

And here they are! 26 day old Freedom Ranger chicks. So far they are all alive although there’s one I’m a little worried about. Good thing the hatchery sent us an extra. It is pretty darn chilly today, but they are all warm and cozy in their box.

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